CRC - Components, Responsibilities, Collaborations

Great for design, great for diagrams

I was reading Dan North Visits Osper and was pleasantly surprised to see Dan mention CRC modelling. CRC is a great technique for the process of designing software, particularly when used in a group/workshop environment. It's not a technique that many people seem to know about nowadays though.

A Google search will yield lots of good explanations on the web, but basically CRC is about helping to identify the classes needed to implement a particular feature, use case, user story, etc. You basically walk through the feature from the start and whenever you identify a candidate class, you write the name of it on a 6x4 index card, additionally annotating the card with the responsibilities of the class. Every card represents a separate class. As you progress through the feature, you identify more classes and create additional cards, annotating the cards with responsibilities and also keeping a note of which classes are collaborating with one another. Of course, you can also refactor your design by splitting classes out or combining them as you progress. When you're done, you can dry-run your feature by walking through the classes (e.g. A calls B to do X, which in turn requests Y from C, etc).

Much of what you'll read about CRC on the web discusses how the technique is useful for teaching OO design at the class level, but I like using it at the component level when faced with architecting a software system given a blank sheet of paper. The same principles apply, but you're identifying components (or services, microservices, etc) rather than classes. When you've done this for a number of significant use cases, you end up with a decent set of CRC cards representing the core components of your software system.

From this, you can start to draw some architecture diagrams using something like my C4 model. Since the cards represent components, you can simply lay out the cards on paper, draw lines between them and you have a component diagram. Each of those components needs to be running in an execution environment (e.g. a web application, database, mobile app, etc). If you draw boxes around groups of components to represent these execution environments, you have a containers diagram. Step up one level further and you can create a simple system context diagram to show how your system interacts with the outside world. My Simple Sketches for Diagramming your Software Architecture article provides more information about the C4 model and the resulting diagrams, but hopefully you get the idea.

CRC then ... yes, it's a great technique for collaborative design, particularly when applied at the component level. And it's a nice starting point for creating software architecture diagrams too.

About the author

Simon is an independent software development consultant specialising in software architecture and the author of Software Architecture for Developers. Simon lives in Jersey and regularly speaks to audiences around the world. You can find Simon on Twitter at @simonbrown and .




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