Software architecture training in London

15th-16th September 2009, Skills Matter, London

The next run of our software architecture training course is taking place at Skills Matter in London on the 15th and 16th of September. I posted a short review of the June 2009 course a while back but it's aimed squarely at software developers that want to get into software architecture and become more "architecturally aware". We like to think that our approach to software architecture is down to earth and pragmatic, while our training approach is a refreshing change:

This workshop is completly different from what you are used to where you are sent by your company to be trained. You don't arrive, sit down, listen and leave the room being an architect. Instead you only go through 50 slides in two days, and spend your time working in small groups and interacting with the others. At the end you leave the workshop with your head full of ideas.

We have some time in the schedule for one or two presentations so I might provide a preview of Documenting your software architecture - why and how? or Broadening the T, which I'm presenting at the Software Architect 2009 conference at the end of the month. Either way, I'm sure there'll be some great discussion about software architecture.

You can book online via the Skills Matter website, and the price is £1095.

About the author

Simon is an independent consultant specializing in software architecture, and the author of Software Architecture for Developers (a developer-friendly guide to software architecture, technical leadership and the balance with agility). He’s also the creator of the C4 software architecture model and the founder of Structurizr, which is a collection of open source and commercial tooling to help software teams visualise, document and explore their software architecture.

You can find Simon on Twitter at @simonbrown ... see simonbrown.je for information about his speaking schedule, videos from past conferences and software architecture training.




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