The non-coding architect

Those who can't code the architecture

I found a great blog entry today by Frank Kelly called How to spot the dreaded non-coding architect (NCA), which is about some of the differences between architects that can code and architects that can't (or don't). Since this site is about "coding the architecture", I thought you might find it interesting too.

These NCA folks can be really quite dangerous and give dev teams a bad name ... But how can you spot one? For most developers it's pretty easy but just in case you can't I've compiled a list of example scenarios that should help - comparing the often dogmatic attitude of the NCA with the pragmatism of the experienced Coding Architect (CA).

Recommended reading and a little humour to brighten up your Monday.

About the author

Simon lives in Jersey (the largest of the Channel Islands) and works as an independent consultant, helping teams to build better software. His client list spans over 20 countries and includes organisations ranging from small technology startups through to global household names. Simon is an award-winning speaker and the author of Software Architecture for Developers - a developer-friendly guide to software architecture, technical leadership and the balance with agility. He still codes too. You can tweet Simon at @simonbrown.



Re: The non-coding architect

Unsure about that article... I can sympathise with pretty much all of the comments made. It's all observation and no context, though.

Without context, the CA is guilty of as much dogma as the NCA! Amusing, probably true, rather misleading.

Re: The non-coding architect

Amusing although I thought it was more about attitude than whether or not the architect writes code (I have known some horribly inflexible and impractical developers).

I thought the tone of it was rather smug, but perhaps I am just feeling got at!

Tom

Re: The non-coding architect

one of the best post i ever read !!!! i am a coding architext (SCEA) and all in this post is true !!!!

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